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Who Are You Meant to Be?

 

Here’s a great article and quiz based on personality science that can help you figure out what defines you. Click the link at the bottom to take the short quiz.

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Forget your career. Forget your role as a mother or a wife. Forget how much money you make or how successful you are. If you’re struggling with the question “Who am I meant to be?”, this quiz can help you figure out what really defines you. Based on personality science, I have identified seven “striving styles,” modes of thought and behavior that direct us to seek satisfaction in different ways. Although everybody is wired with all seven styles, most people have one that dominates. When you engage this innate style, you’ve got the best shot at fulfilling your potential; when you don’t, you can feel stuck.

After responding to the statements below, you will discover your striving style, learn what to do if it’s backfiring from neglect, and find ideas to guide your life in the direction that it was meant to go.

Follow the link to take the short quiz and at the end see what defines you. enjoy!
Read more: http://www.oprah.com/spirit/Who-Are-You-Meant-to-Be-Self-Assessment-Quiz#ixzz2is2nyxlc

Going On A Job Interview

job interviewJob interviews are typically the last stage in the hiring process, used to evaluate the best candidates. Interviews are usually preceded by the evaluation of a resume, selecting a small number of candidates who seem to be the most desirable (shortlisting).
A company seeking to fill a single position will typically interview a handful of candidates – perhaps as many as ten if the level of application has been high. While job interviews are considered to be one of the most useful tools for evaluating potential employees, they also demand significant resources from the employer and have been demonstrated to be notoriously unreliable in identifying the optimal person for the job.
Multiple rounds of job interviews may be used where there are many candidates or the job is particularly challenging or desirable; earlier rounds may involve fewer staff from the employers and will typically be much shorter and less in-depth. A common initial interview form is the phone interview, a job interview conducted over the telephone. This is especially common when the candidates do not live near the employer and has the advantage of keeping costs low for both sides.
Once all candidates have had job interviews, the employer typically selects the most desirable candidate and begins the negotiation of a job offer.
A typical job interview has a single candidate meeting with between one and three persons representing the employer; the potential supervisor of the employee is usually involved in the interview process. A larger interview panel will often have a specialized human resources worker. The meeting can be as short as 15 minutes; job interviews usually last less than two hours. The bulk of the job interview will be the interviewers asking the candidate questions about their history, personality, work style and other relevant factors to the job. The candidate will usually be given a chance to ask any questions at the end of the interview. The primary purpose is to assess the candidate’s suitability for the job, although the candidate will also be assessing the corporate culture and demands of the job on offer.
Lower paid and lower skilled positions tend to have much simpler job interviews than more prestigious positions; a lawyer’s job interview will be much more demanding than that of a retail cashier.
job interviewMost job interviews are formal; the larger the firm, the more formal and structured the interview will tend to be. Candidates generally dress slightly better than they will be expected to wear to work, with a suit being appropriate for a white-collar job interview, but jeans being appropriate for an interview as a plumber.
Additionally, some professions have specific types of job interviews; for performing artists, this is an audition where the emphasis is placed on the performance ability of the candidate.
Psychometric testing may also be used in job interviews.
In many countries including most of North America, Western Europe and Australasia, employment equity laws forbid discrimination based on a number of classes, such as race, gender, age, and marital status. Asking questions about these protected areas in a job interview is generally considered discriminatory, and constitutes an illegal hiring practice. Asking questions that touch on these areas, such as “Are you willing to travel/relocate?” (possibly affected by marital status) or “When did you graduate from school?” (indicative of age) is still usually possible.
There is extant data which puts in question the value of Job Interviews as a tool for selecting employees. Where the aim of a job interview is ostensibly to choose a candidate who will perform well in the job role, other methods of selection provide greater predictive power and often lower costs. Furthermore, given the unstructured approach of most interviews they often have almost no useful predictive power of employee success.

Writing A Resume

writing a resumeWhat to do when you don’t have the experience for the job that you want. People think of their resume as a collective of their education, skills and professional experience. Many employers rely on resumes as form of job applications for the open positions within their organizations. Thus it is very important that you have a well-written resume prepared when searching for jobs.
Creating a resume is not an easy task, even if you are a professional with years of experience and many skills. However, composing a resume when you are looking to completely change careers, or when you are fresh out of school is much more difficult, because you do not have any experience to highlight.
If you are changing careers, and nothing from your past professional experience qualifies you for the new job you are seeking, highlight those qualifications that can be transitioned along the various industries. For example, if you’ve managed people, no matter the type of business, you should highlight this under your experience. Rather than not highlighting your professional experience, even if it is not directly related to the job you are seeking, you should consider writing a professional profile, or summary at the start of your resume. The summary will allow you to address the career change by highlighting your skills and how they relate to your career objective. In addition, this is one situation where it is OK to reference any volunteer or community service work that you have done if it can help promote your qualifications for the job.
writing a resumeIf you are fresh out of college, and don’t have much to bring to the table in terms of full time professional experience, don’t get discouraged in creating your resume. Focus on highlighting your skills and your education. Avoid using a professional profile, or summary. Rather, list your career objective and start the resume by listing your education. Make sure to mention any awards or honors you received while in school. Following your education, list all the skills that will qualify you for the job you are seeking. Make sure to mention any courses, such as project management or business communication that you have taken and can apply at work. Instead of listing any experience, title the section “Pre-professional Experience” and divide it into categories applicable to your career objective. For example, instead of say that you spent a summer working at the Gap, use a sub-heading of “Customer Relations” and list any responsibilities where you have provided customer service. Tap into any community service, volunteer, or school club positions you have held in order to highlight your abilities and showcase that you are the best candidate for the job.
Don’t be afraid of not having the right experience, or not having any professional experience to include in a resume. Focus on what you can do rather than what you don’t have the experience in doing and you will have a winning resume.

When The Recruiter Calls

Recruiter callingRecruiting, retained or contingency, involves (or should, anyway) directly approaching individuals who, based on their title or position, might well have the experience to handle the job description and position for which the client is seeking someone. The individuals who are approached, of course, are usually currently employed at one of the client’s competitors.
If that individual is you, what would you do? What would you do when a recruiter calls and briefly outlines an opportunity with an unnamed company? Obviously if you’re unhappy where you are and the opportunity sounds interesting, you’re going to bite.
But I’m not talking about that scenario. I’m talking about the response when you ARE happy where you are. Because there’s a smart way to respond and a not-so-smart way to respond. And either choice impacts your career far more than you’d think it does!
So there you are, sitting at your desk working on an important project, when the phone rings. And you pick it up. It’s a recruiter, who introduces himself, his firm, and asks if you have a minute. What do you say? “Thanks for calling, but I’m happy where I am.” And hang up the phone? WRONG ANSWER!
Why? Because you just cut yourself off from knowing what’s moving and shaking in your industry, which means you just cut yourself off from hearing about unadvertised opportunities that could potentially leverage your career.
You’ve just made the decision to limit your options. And if you don’t have access to information, you can’t make an informed decision, can you?
What should you do instead? No matter how happy you are with your current company, listen to what the recruiter has to say. You have a far better chance of leveraging your career when a recruiter calls you rather than when (and if) you contact a recruiter.
There are people who are truly happy with their current position and not interested in currently making a change, regardless of the opportunity presented to them at that moment. But you listen anyway, not to change, but to develop a relationship and keep yourself informed and in control for you when you do need to change.